Schreiber Pediatric Center - Penn State students build a better bike for Schreiber

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February 26, 2019

Penn State students build a better bike for Schreiber

Posted by Dan  Permalink 

We have a lot of therapy bikes at Schreiber. But there was a certain kind of bike we were missing: a hand bike, no pedaling, for school-age kids. Enter a group of senior mechanical engineering students from Penn State Harrisburg.

Bernie Hershey, right, a Schreiber occupational therapist, guides Owen Hull as he rides on the first version of a new therapy bike. The bike was made by a team of four mechanical engineering students from Penn State Harrisburg, including Nicole Linke and Michael Ruch, who are behind Bernie and Owen.

Bernie Hershey, a Schreiber occupational therapist, was the one who suggested the project to the group in September.

The students, all seniors -- Nicole Linke, 21; Cody Mackanick, 23; Michael Ruch, 23; and Andrew Saienni, 23 -- came to visit Schreiber after Nicole and Michael had interned over the summer with Arconic, a Lancaster County manufacturer. Arconic has supported Schreiber for several years by donating and sending volunteers. Nicole and Michael joined a group of Arconic employees for a service day at Schreiber that included a tour by Susan Fisher, Schreiber's volunteer coordinator.

"We have one hand bike, and it's too small for some of the kids that need it," Bernie said. "Susan brought them to me, and they said they were looking for a capstone project for their senior year."

From left, Nicole Linke, Cody Mackanick and Michael Ruch, students from Penn State Harrisburg, demonstrate for Bernie Hershey the new therapy bike they built for Schreiber.

The tour sparked their engineer brains immediately.

"When I saw this old therapy bike they had, I was intrigued," Nicole said. "I thought that looked like something we could work on."

The idea they developed with Bernie was to build a bike for kids ages 6-12 that would require the kids to pedal using only their hands. (Watch Zoey Zweizig do a demonstration ride in the video below.)

"We're always looking for ways to have upper body resistance," Bernie said. "One of the best ways to build upper body strength is to have them propel themselves through space."

That movement triggers the release of endorphins in the brain that are pleasing and calming at the same time. Bernie saw that immediately when Owen Hull climbed on the bike. Owen is 5, and he receives occupational, physical and speech-language therapy at Schreiber. He's on the autism spectrum, said his mom Monica Hull.

Owen Hull, who is on the autism spectrum, opened up after riding for a few minutes on the prototype of the new therapy bike.

"If you noticed, the more he rode the more he talked to the college students," Bernie said. "He engaged with those kids, which he normally doesn't do. He was mechanically inspecting the bike and asking questions about it. Oh, I got such a charge out of it."

The students have enjoyed the work, too. They started in September and the bike they brought this week was a first prototype. They will take it back and make adjustments based on the feedback from Bernie, and from the kids. They asked the kids what colors the bike should be, for example. The project should be finished in April and will be exhibited during Penn State Harrisburg's annual show of capstone engineering projects in May.

None of the students knew anything about Schreiber a year ago. All are from outside of Lancaster County. But they connected right away with Schreiber's mission and wanted to do something to help.

"I just liked spending a year working on something that will help someone instead of making something for a company that might not even use it," Nicole said.

"Knowing that it would be used every day is really important," Cody Mackanick added.

The students raised the money for the bike themselves, about $1,500 in all, through a GoFundMe page. They spent a portion of that for the materials to build the bike.

And the rest? That money they will donate that to Schreiber.

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